The Islamic State terror group said Wednesday it smuggled a bomb on board a Russian airliner that went down last month in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, after discovering a “way to compromise the security” at an Egyptian airport.

The picture was published in the latest issue of the group’s English-language propaganda magazine Dabiq, with the caption “Exclusive — Image of the IED used to bring down the Russian airliner.”

The picture shows a yellow can of Schweppes Gold soda and what appear to be other bomb components, and of passports that had belonged to the dead passengers and were retrieved from the crash site in the Egyptian province.

The terror group, which has a powerful affiliate in the Sinai, had previously claimed to have downed the plane without offering further details.

The latest edition of its official online magazine said IS had initially planned to down a plane belonging to a country from the US-led coalition targeting militants in Iraq and Syria.

Combination of undated photos purports to show Ole Johan Grimsgaard-Ofstad, 48, from Oslo, Norway, left, and Fan Jinghui, 50, from Beijing, China. The pictures came from the terror group's online magazine Dabiq, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. (Dabiq via AP)

Combination of undated photos purports to show Ole Johan Grimsgaard-Ofstad, 48, from Oslo, Norway, left, and Fan Jinghui, 50, from Beijing, China. The pictures came from the terror group’s online magazine Dabiq, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. (Dabiq via AP)

The militants decided to instead target the Russian plane departing the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh after Moscow began an air campaign in Syria in late September, the magazine said.

Russia’s FSB security service said Tuesday that a bomb brought down the plane. Most of those onboard were Russian tourists. Egypt says it is still investigating the cause of the crash.

The issue also announced the group had executed a Chinese and a Norwegian hostage, and printed photos of bodies it said were those of Fan Jinghui and Ole-Johan Grimsgaard-Oftsad.

A stamp-like caption overlaid on one of the photos read, “Executed after being “abandoned by the kafir (disbeliever) nations and organisations.”

The magazine also praised the wave of shooting and suicide bombing attacks against “wicked crusaders” in the French capital which killed 129 people last Friday.

“The eight knights brought Paris down on its knees, after years of French conceit in the face of Islam,” the magazine said. “And so revenge was exacted upon those who felt safe in the cockpits of their jets.”