‘Forensic institute concealed evidence in murder case’
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‘Forensic institute concealed evidence in murder case’

Father may have been convicted of killing his baby because pathologists withheld body parts from defense attorneys

Dr. Yehuda Hiss, chief pathologist at Abu Kabir Forensic Institute (photo credit: Kobi Gideon/Flash90)
Dr. Yehuda Hiss, chief pathologist at Abu Kabir Forensic Institute (photo credit: Kobi Gideon/Flash90)

A father may have been convicted of killing his baby because the Abu Kabir Forensic Institute withheld remains of the boy from defense attorneys, according to chief public defender Yoav Sapir.

Sapir sent a letter to Attorney General Yehuda Weinstein on Wednesday asking that charges be brought against Dr. Yehuda Hiss, chief pathologist at Abu Kabir, for obstruction of justice and perjury in the case of Denis Eisen.

In 2000, Eisen was convicted of the murder of his infant son Ron, based on a pathological report from Abu Kabir that stated Ron died of head injuries, and sentenced to 20 years in prison.

Eisen, who maintained his innocence, was awarded a retrial in 2005. When the forensic institute claimed to have no remains of the infant’s body except those that were submitted to the court, Eisen pled guilty to manslaughter.

Then, one week ago, the prosecution informed the public defender’s office that parts of Ron Eisen’s body had been found at Abu Kabir: his brain, a crucial piece of evidence, and other organs.

Sapir wrote to Weinstein that the findings not only point to the possibility that Eisen was wrongly convicted, but that Hiss, as director of the forensic institute, and his subordinates were criminally negligent. Further, if they knew that the body parts were present, then their statements to the contrary to defense attorneys throughout both trials constituted perjury.

The Eisen case would be the latest in a series of accusations of wrongdoing at Abu Kabir under Hiss’ direction, with charges of organ harvesting, unauthorized autopsies and mix-ups in the burial of body parts.

In 2005, Hiss admitted that the institute had harvested heart valves, skin and bones from bodies autopsied there, but said that the practice no longer took place.

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