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Thousands across US march against Trump for second day

Holding placards reading ‘Dump Trump’ and chanting ‘Not Our President,’ protesters take to streets; president-elect goes on Twitter to blame media

People take part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in front of Trump Tower in New York on November 10, 2016. (AFP/Kena Betancur)
People take part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in front of Trump Tower in New York on November 10, 2016. (AFP/Kena Betancur)

Thousands of people, many of them students who skipped classes, staged fresh protests on Thursday in several US cities in anger at Donald Trump’s election as president.

Shouting “Not my president!” and carrying placards that read “I did not elect hate for president,” some 300 people marched in Baltimore, many of them massing outside M&T Bank Stadium, where the Baltimore Ravens were playing the Cleveland Browns in a primetime NFL matchup on live TV.

Protests were also taking place in Chicago, Denver, Dallas and elsewhere.

“We are just showing that this is going to be the next four years, it’ll be four years of resistance,” Kaila Philo, a 21-year-old student, told The Baltimore Sun.

US President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump shake hands during a transition planning meeting in the Oval Office at the White House on November 10, 2016, in Washington,DC. (JIM WATSON/AFP)
US President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump shake hands during a transition planning meeting in the Oval Office at the White House on November 10, 2016, in Washington,DC. (JIM WATSON/AFP)

She said she had created an event on Facebook for her friends that ended up attracting thousands.

Taking to Twitter for only the second time since being elected, Trump said the protests were the work of “professional protesters, incited by the media.”

In San Francisco, some 1,000 students, most of them high schoolers, marched through the city’s financial district toward City Hall chanting “Not my president!” and blocking traffic.

“We are protesting because we want to stand up for our rights and we deserve to be heard,” Pamela Campos, 18, told the San Francisco Chronicle.

“Donald Trump is just racist. He’s attacking all the immigrants, all the Muslims. I saw all my classmates crying yesterday.”

Students held walkouts in several other cities in northern California, including Napa and Hayward.

In Los Angeles, several hundred students marched at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) campus carrying placards that read “Dump Trump” and “Love trumps hate.”

“Initially, I accepted his election but yesterday when I saw Hillary’s concession speech I couldn’t avoid crying,” Daisy Rivera, 24, told AFP, referring to Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

“I can’t believe we have that racist, xenophobic, misogynist elected president.”

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti condemned anti-Trump demonstrators who damaged property and blocked traffic.

But he also said Thursday he’s proud of the thousands of people who took to streets peacefully on Wednesday.

The mayor, a Democrat and grandson of a Mexican immigrant, said he might have hit the bricks as well if he was younger. He called the peaceful demonstrations “a beautiful expression of democracy.”

On Thursday, a few dozen people again blocked a freeway in the Boyle Heights area. Authorities cleared one group but a second continued to block an onramp.

A woman looks on as she takes part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in front of Trump Tower in New York on November 10, 2016. (AFP/ KENA BETANCUR)
A woman looks on as she takes part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in front of Trump Tower in New York on November 10, 2016. (AFP/ Kena Betancur)

A crowd that included parents with children in strollers gathered Thursday night near Philadelphia’s City Hall. They held signs bearing slogans like “Not Our President,” ”Trans Against Trump” and “Make America Safe For All.”

About 500 people turned out in Louisville, Kentucky, chanting and carrying signs as they marched downtown. A day earlier, five people were arrested at Western Kentucky University as demonstrators protested Trump’s election.

In New York, some 200 anti-Trump protesters gathered at Washington Square Park in Manhattan.

At a subway station along 14th Street, New Yorkers expressed their thoughts — “Time to Fight Back” and “Keep the Faith! Our work is just beginning!” — along the walls of a walkway using sticky notes.

On Twitter, Trump supporters accused protesters of not respecting the process because it didn’t work out in their favor.

“You’re literally protesting against free democratic elections. Go live in North Korea, you absolute trash,” one said. “They’re not protesting Trump, they’re protesting democracy and the right to disagree with them. Isn’t that fascism,” said another.

A trash fire burns during protests in Oakland, Calif., late Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. President-elect Donald Trump’s victory set off multiple protests. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group via AP)
A trash fire burns during protests in Oakland, Calif., late Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. President-elect Donald Trump’s victory set off multiple protests. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group via AP)

Thousands demonstrated Wednesday around the country, from New England to Kansas City to the West Coast. Flames lit up the night sky in California cities as protesters burned a giant papier-mache Trump head in Los Angeles and started fires in Oakland intersections.

In Chicago, where thousands had recently poured into the streets to celebrate the Chicago Cubs’ first World Series victory in over a century, several thousand people marched through the Loop. They gathered outside Trump Tower, chanting “Not my president!”

Since Tuesday night, protesters have marched in the Midwest, including St. Paul, Minnesota, Omaha, Nebraska, and Kansas City, Missouri. Marchers protesting Trump’s election chanted and carried signs in front of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C.

More demonstrations were also being planned over the weekend.

During the presidential campaign many Americans expressed outrage over Trump’s rhetoric on immigrants, Muslims and refugees, and some fear he will act on those policies once he becomes president on January 20.

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