Iran’s speaker: If US walks away from deal, Tehran may follow
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Iran’s speaker: If US walks away from deal, Tehran may follow

Ali Larijani says Washington causing international chaos with sanctions, thanks Russia for its support

A view of the reactor building at the Russian-built nuclear power plant in Bushehr, in southern Iran, as the first fuel is loaded, August 21, 2010. (Iran International Photo Agency via Getty Images/via JTA/File)
A view of the reactor building at the Russian-built nuclear power plant in Bushehr, in southern Iran, as the first fuel is loaded, August 21, 2010. (Iran International Photo Agency via Getty Images/via JTA/File)

The speaker of Iran’s parliament on Friday said Tehran will consider walking away from the nuclear deal if Washington withdraws from the accord.

“Certainly, that’s a possibility,” Ali Larijani said on Friday in Russia, in response to a direct question on the matter, according to the TASS news agency.

Speaking in St. Petersburg, Larijani also accused the US of sowing international chaos with its sanctions against Moscow and Tehran, the Russian news agency reported.

“They seem to have begun certain movements, which in the long run will cause a lack of order on the international arena,” he said. “The proof of that are the sanctions, which they have announced against Iran and against Russia, as well as the measures they recently began undertaking in relation to the nuclear deal with Iran.”

Iranian Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani (photo credit: AP/Vahid Salemi)
Iranian Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani (photo credit: AP/Vahid Salemi)

“Over the past months, Americans have repeatedly violated nuclear agreements,” Larijani said. “We would like to thank Russia for its stand, as well as… Lavrov, who… said that the Americans have violated the JCPOA.”

In a speech later Friday, US President Donald Trump is expected to declare the landmark 2015 agreement — which curbed Iran’s nuclear program in return for massive sanctions relief — is no longer in the US national interest.

Officials say he will not kill the international accord outright, instead “decertifying” the agreement and leaving US lawmakers to decide its fate.

Trump had repeatedly pledged to overturn one of his predecessor Barack Obama’s crowning foreign policy achievements, deriding it as “the worst deal” and one agreed to out of “weakness.”

The agreement was signed between Iran and six world powers — Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the US — at talks coordinated by the European Union.

While the deal stalled Iran’s nuclear program and thawed relations between Iran and its “Great Satan,” opponents say it also prevented efforts to challenge Iranian influence in the Middle East.

Since coming to office, Trump has faced intense lobbying from international allies and his own national security team, who argued the deal should remain in place.

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