Israel agrees to sell 30 aging F-16 planes to Croatia
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Israel agrees to sell 30 aging F-16 planes to Croatia

Agreement, advanced during Netanyahu’s meeting with PM Andrej Plenkovic, said to be worth half a billion dollars; still requires US approval

Jacob Magid is the settlements correspondent for The Times of Israel.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) meets with Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on January 24, 2018. (Amos Ben-Gershom/GPO)
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (R) meets with Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on January 24, 2018. (Amos Ben-Gershom/GPO)

DAVOS, Switzerland — Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic agreed to move forward with the sale of Israeli F-16s to Croatia on Thursday, the Prime Minister’s Office announced on Friday.

The arrangement was advanced during a meeting held on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

The deal — which will send some 30 F-16s to Croatia — is estimated to be worth half a billion dollars, according to Hadashot news.

However, the sale is still subject to the terms of a tender in Croatia and also requires US approval, as Washington produces the planes.

Israel has been seeking a buyer for the aging fleet that its Air Force stopped using a number of years ago, according to Hadashot news. Some 30 old planes have been retired by Israel’s Air Force in recent years.

Also during their meeting Thursday, the two leaders agreed to expand cooperation on various fronts including on economic issues, security and tourism, the PMO said.

Netanyahu flew home Friday morning from Davos after two days of marathon meetings with over a dozen world leaders, including US President Donald Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel  and Rwandan President Paul Kagabe.

Prior to boarding his plane back to Israel, the prime minister summarized the trip to reporters, simply saying “these are good days for Israel.”

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