Cosmetic surgery in Israel up by 30 percent
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Cosmetic surgery in Israel up by 30 percent

While women still account for more than two thirds of patients, number of men undergoing procedures is increasing

Aaron Kalman is a former writer and breaking news editor for the Times of Israel

Breast enlargement surgery in Tel Aviv (photo credit: Chen Leopold/Flash 90)
Breast enlargement surgery in Tel Aviv (photo credit: Chen Leopold/Flash 90)

Cosmetic surgery in Israel is on the rise, with a 30 percent climb in the number of people electing to go under the knife or laser over the past year.

A report released ahead of a conference dealing with cosmetic surgery and medical practices in Israel, scheduled for Tuesday, revealed that the growing demand for such procedures resulted in a rise of more than 10 percent in the number of doctors entering the field.

Dr. Robert Cohen, who chairs the union of aesthetic doctors in Israel, told Maariv that one should also count some 300 dentists who underwent training in aesthetic dental treatments, out of which 100 or so chose to leave their previous job entirely.

Cohen also said that there was a steady climb in the number of men who opted for beauty treatments, increasing by 10-15% from last year, but women still made up 70% of the total.

According to the union, the most common treatments in Israel are Botox injections and other fillings, along with hair implants.

Cohen said Israel was far behind many European countries when it came to men undergoing cosmetic surgery. “The treatment still causes discomfort to many men,” Cohen told Maariv, “especially when they need to sit next to women in the waiting room.”

The study showed that certain procedures, such as liposuction, were on a steady decline.

Cohen estimated the Israeli cosmetic market to be bringing in hundreds of millions of shekels on an annual basis, and doctors in the field could earn a few hundred thousand shekels a month.

He also stressed that doctors dealing with cosmetic procedures were subject to a large number of lawsuits. Legal aspects of the job would be addressed at the conference, he said.

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