Turkey, Jordan call for ‘serious’ Israel-Palestinian peace talks
search

Turkey, Jordan call for ‘serious’ Israel-Palestinian peace talks

Leaders call for resumption of negotiations ‘based on international resolutions’ and a ‘precise timetable’

Jordan's King Abdullah II (R) meets with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at the royal palace in Amman on August 21, 2017. (AFP Photo/Khalil Mazraawi)
Jordan's King Abdullah II (R) meets with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at the royal palace in Amman on August 21, 2017. (AFP Photo/Khalil Mazraawi)

AMMAN, Jordan — Jordan’s King Abdullah II and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday called for new “serious and effective” peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians, the royal palace said.

Meeting in Amman, they urged “the resumption of serious and effective negotiations between the Palestinians and Israel to end the conflict on the basis of a two-state solution to assure an independent Palestinian state with June 1967 borders and East Jerusalem as capital.”

Talks between Israel and the Palestinians have been at a standstill since the failure of US mediation in the spring of 2014.

“New peace negotiations must take place according to a precise timetable and be based on international resolutions,” Erdogan and Abdullah said.

They also expressed their “unequivocal rejection of any attempt to change the legal and historical situation in the Al-Aqsa Mosque and any unilateral Israeli action threatening the identity of East Jerusalem.”

Jordan, the only Arab country apart from Egypt to have signed a peace treaty with Israel, is custodian of the Muslim holy sites East Jerusalem, which Israel captured from Jordan in the 1967 Six Day War.

Muslims pray at the Temple Mount on July 27, 2017.(AFP Photo/Ahmad Gharabli)
Muslims pray at the Temple Mount on July 27, 2017.(AFP Photo/Ahmad Gharabli)

The sensitive Temple Mount compound in Jerusalem’s Old City was the focus last month of a tense standoff after Israel introduced new security measures following a terror attack in which three Arab Israelis shot dead two police officers using weapons smuggled into the Al-Aqsa Mosque.

Jordan’s king said earlier this month that a peaceful solution to the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians was becoming more and more difficult.

In January, US President Donald Trump came to power promising to push Israelis and Palestinians towards a peace deal, raising brief hopes among Palestinians that his unconventional approach could achieve results.

But Palestinians have become increasingly frustrated by what they say is his negotiating team’s one-sided approach.

Abdullah and Erdogan on Monday also underlined the importance of a political solution to end the war in Syria.

All diplomatic efforts to end to the conflict that has caused more than 330,000 deaths and displaced millions since 2011 have failed.

However, the two leaders welcomed an agreement that followed trilateral talks between Jordan, the United States and Russia that resulted in a truce in three regions of southern Syria.

Join us!
A message from the Editor of Times of Israel
David Horovitz

The Times of Israel covers one of the most complicated, and contentious, parts of the world. Determined to keep readers fully informed and enable them to form and flesh out their own opinions, The Times of Israel has gradually established itself as the leading source of independent and fair-minded journalism on Israel, the region and the Jewish world.

We've achieved this by investing ever-greater resources in our journalism while keeping all of the content on our site free.

Unlike many other news sites, we have not put up a paywall. But we would like to invite readers who can afford to do so, and for whom The Times of Israel has become important, to help support our journalism by joining The Times of Israel Community. Join now and for as little as $6 a month you can both help ensure our ongoing investment in quality journalism, and enjoy special status and benefits as a Times of Israel Community member.

Become a member of The Times of Israel Community
read more:
comments