With end of Passover, Israelis celebrate Mimouna
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With end of Passover, Israelis celebrate Mimouna

Politicians visit supporters across the country, eating traditional North African pancakes and other sweets

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyau and his wife Sara attend a Mimouna celebration in Hadera on April 17, 2017. (Ido Erez/Pool/Flash90)
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyau and his wife Sara attend a Mimouna celebration in Hadera on April 17, 2017. (Ido Erez/Pool/Flash90)

Israelis across the country on Monday night celebrated Mimouna, a North African Jewish tradition held each year to celebrate the end of Passover.

In what has become a modern tradition, politicians fanned out to supporters’ homes to eat traditional honey-covered pancakes called mufletot and other sweets.

At an event in the northern city of Hadera, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said that despite starting as a Moroccan tradition, Mimouna “has turned into a holiday for all the ethnic groups.”

“It symbolizes a love for Israel,” he said.

He also called Mimouna a “colorful holiday” and said jokingly that “I promise to continue to be colorful” in reference to his frequently changing hair color.

Culture Minister Miri Regev (Likud) uploaded a video of herself in traditional Moroccan garb from an event in the southern city of Ashkelon in which she “wishes to all of the Jewish people health, happiness, success and abundance.”

Regev said that the celebration in Ashkelon was her first of the evening, as she planned to visit the homes of other friends and Likud party activists also marking the holiday.

Posted by ‎Miri Regev מירי רגב‎ on pirmdiena, 2017. gada 17. aprīlis

Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (Kulanu) and Transportation Minister Yisrael Katz also stopped by Mimouna celebrations, with photos showing them enjoying mufletot.

In addition to the ministers, Coalition Chairman David Bitan (Likud) also celebrated the Mimouna with a fez hat, while opposition leader Isaac Herzog took part in an event.

Though the tradition is unique to North African Jewry, the Mimouna has largely become an Israeli holiday, with those without North African roots visiting friends’ houses to take part in the celebration.

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