Netanyahu seeks reforms to stabilize Israeli governance
search
Elections 2015

Netanyahu seeks reforms to stabilize Israeli governance

At Likud event, PM to announce initiative to change situation wherein average government serves less than half its allotted term

Haviv Rettig Gur is The Times of Israel's senior analyst.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Knesset during a vote on a bill to dissolve the parliament, on December 8, 2014. (photo credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Knesset during a vote on a bill to dissolve the parliament, on December 8, 2014. (photo credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will announce Monday night his intention to dramatically change Israel’s system of government if he wins reelection on March 17.

Netanyahu is slated to speak at the Likud party’s election event in Tel Aviv, where the party will present its official Knesset slate following last week’s primary, and will formally launch its election campaign.

At the event, the prime minister will lay out his proposal to alter Israel’s system of government in a way that will ensure Israeli governments are much more likely to survive the four-year terms to which they are elected, sources told The Times of Israel ahead of the event.

The government that will be formed after the March elections will be Israel’s 34th in 67 years, making the average lifespan of an Israeli government slightly less than half its allotted term.

By law, governments fall when they lose the support of the Knesset and cannot muster a majority of MKs to vote down the opposition’s weekly “no-confidence” motions.

Once they are felled, a new Knesset coalition may be cobbled together to form a new government without elections — or the country goes to elections.

Governments must also fall if they fail to pass a state budget.

There are no details as yet on what specific reforms Netanyahu plans to bring to the Knesset, but sources say they will ensure it will become far more difficult to topple a government mid-term, bringing greater stability to the political system and government policy.

The Knesset has seen a series of attempts at reforming Israel’s electoral system, including the institution for a few years of a separate ballot to elect the prime minister.

In the outgoing Knesset, a “Governance Law” passed which, among other measures, raised the electoral threshold from 2 percent of the popular vote to 3.25%, likely reducing the number of small parties that will be elected to the next Knesset.

Join us!
A message from the Editor of Times of Israel
David Horovitz

The Times of Israel covers one of the most complicated, and contentious, parts of the world. Determined to keep readers fully informed and enable them to form and flesh out their own opinions, The Times of Israel has gradually established itself as the leading source of independent and fair-minded journalism on Israel, the region and the Jewish world.

We've achieved this by investing ever-greater resources in our journalism while keeping all of the content on our site free.

Unlike many other news sites, we have not put up a paywall. But we would like to invite readers who can afford to do so, and for whom The Times of Israel has become important, to help support our journalism by joining The Times of Israel Community. Join now and for as little as $6 a month you can both help ensure our ongoing investment in quality journalism, and enjoy special status and benefits as a Times of Israel Community member.

Become a member of The Times of Israel Community
read more:
comments