Object ‘resembling’ explosive belt found in Paris suburb
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Object ‘resembling’ explosive belt found in Paris suburb

Police sources say object found in Montrouge garbage being analyzed; prime suspect Salah Abdeslam was in area after attacks

Illustrative. A French soldier stands guard in front of the Great Mosque in Strasbourg, eastern France, during Friday prayers on November 20, 2015. Muslims gathered here to pay tribute to the victims of the November 13 attacks. (AFP/Partrick Hertzog)
Illustrative. A French soldier stands guard in front of the Great Mosque in Strasbourg, eastern France, during Friday prayers on November 20, 2015. Muslims gathered here to pay tribute to the victims of the November 13 attacks. (AFP/Partrick Hertzog)

PARIS — A “belt that may resemble an explosive belt” was found Monday in the southern Paris suburb of Montrouge, sources close to the investigation said, 10 days after attacks in the capital left 130 people dead.

The object was found in a dustbin on Monday afternoon, a police source said, confirming information reported by France Info radio.

The belt, which was found by dustmen, is being analyzed “to confirm whether it is explosive,” a source close to the inquiry said.

The source said telephone data placed Belgian-born Salah Abdeslam, a key suspect in the attacks who is believed to still be on the run, in the Montrouge area on the night of the attacks.

The arrest warrant issued for 26-year-old Salah Abdeslam, suspected of involvement in the November 13, 2015. terror attacks in Paris. 'Do not intervene yourself,' warns the message issued November 15, 2015.
The arrest warrant issued for 26-year-old Salah Abdeslam, suspected of involvement in the November 13, 2015. terror attacks in Paris. ‘Do not intervene yourself,’ warns the message issued November 15, 2015.

Abdeslam is the subject of a massive manhunt in both France and Belgium, suspected of playing at least a logistical role in the coordinated November 13 shooting and suicide bombings.

The lawyer of one of the men who has been charged on suspicion of helping Abdeslam escape to Brussels after the carnage, said the key suspect “may have been ready to detonate.”

Of around a dozen people suspected of playing a role in the attacks, seven blew themselves up: two at the Bataclan concert venue, three at the Stade de France stadium, one at a cafe on Boulevard Voltaire and one during a post-attacks police raid at an apartment in Saint-Denis, north of Paris.

The suicide belt worn by a third attacker at the Bataclan exploded after he was killed by French security forces.

Francois Molins, the anti-terror prosecutor who is taking center-stage in the investigation, said the vests used in the attacks were made using TATP — acetone peroxide, a chemical easy for amateurs to make — as well as batteries and a push-button detonator.

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