Teva settles with Oklahoma for $85 million in opioid case
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Teva settles with Oklahoma for $85 million in opioid case

Struggling Israeli pharmaceutical giant fighting multiple lawsuits

The Israeli drug company TEVA Pharmaceutical Industries, in Jerusalem, on August 6, 2017. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
The Israeli drug company TEVA Pharmaceutical Industries, in Jerusalem, on August 6, 2017. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

Israeli-owned Teva Pharmaceuticals, one of the drugmakers named in Oklahoma’s lawsuit over the opioid crisis, has agreed to a settlement in which it will pay the state $85 million.

Teva and Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter both announced the settlement Sunday in separate statements. Teva, its related affiliates, and Johnson & Johnson and several of its subsidiaries were set to go to trial Tuesday in Norman.

Hunter said the case against Johnson & Johnson will proceed on schedule.

He also said the funds from the settlement with Teva will be used to fight the opioid crisis in Oklahoma.

“The settlement does not establish any wrongdoing on the part of the company; Teva has not contributed to the abuse of opioids in Oklahoma in any way,” Teva said in a statement. “Teva continues to advocate for collaborative solutions throughout the country.”

Earlier this year, Oklahoma settled with OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma for $270 million.

In March, New York state sued the billionaire Sackler family behind Purdue, the company that created the opioid painkiller OxyContin, joining a growing list of state and local governments seeking to hold not only the firm, but also its owners accountable for the nation’s opioid crisis.

Five other companies that produce opioid medicines, included Teva, and four drug distributors, which buy medications in bulk and sell them to pharmacies, were also added as defendants.

The struggling Israeli pharmaceutical giant was hit earlier this month with another blow, when it was named as a one of the defendants in an anti-trust lawsuit brought by over 40 US states alleging a price-fixing effort among drug manufacturers.

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