UN, Iran agree to restart talks in September
search

UN, Iran agree to restart talks in September

Discussion to focus on Parchin facility, where the Islamic Republic is believed to have tested explosive triggers for a nuclear blast

Satellite image of the Parchin facility, April 2012 (AP/Institute for Science and International Security)
Satellite image of the Parchin facility, April 2012 (AP/Institute for Science and International Security)

VIENNA (AP) — Iran and the UN nuclear agency have agreed to restart talks focused on the agency’s attempts to probe suspicions that Tehran worked on atomic weapons, diplomats said Wednesday, in the first such meeting since Iran’s hard-line president was replaced by a more moderate successor.

The diplomats told The Associated Press that the negotiations will resume September 27, with the main focus on gaining access to a section of a military site that the UN’s International Atomic Energy Agency has long tried to access.

Before the talks were suspended earlier this year, IAEA experts met Iranian negotiators 10 times over 18 months in futile efforts to start their probe of the area in question at the Parchin complex, southeast of Tehran. The agency suspects that the location was used by the Islamic Republic to test conventional explosive triggers for a nuclear blast. Iran denies working on atomic weapons at Parchin or anywhere else and says its nuclear program is peaceful.

With no new date announced for the resumption of broader nuclear talks between Iran and five world powers on hold, the meeting on Parchin will be the first test of centrist President Hasan Rouhani’s pledge to reduce confrontation with the international community over its atomic activities.

Under former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran blamed the IAEA for the standoff over Parchin, saying it is caused by the agency’s refusal to agree on strict parameters that would govern its probe. The agency in turn says such an agreement would tie its hands by putting limits on what it could look for and whom it could question. It bases its suspicions of nuclear-weapons research and development by Iran on its own research and intelligence from the US, Israel and other Iran critics.

IAEA chief Yukiya Amano told reporters earlier this year he was concerned about satellite images showing asphalt work, soil removal, and “possible dismantling of infrastructures” at Parchin. Iran says such activities are part of regular construction that has nothing to do with alleged attempts to cleanse the area of evidence. But Amano said that because of such activities, “it may no longer be possible to find anything even if we have access to the site.”

The two Vienna-based diplomats are experts on nuclear issues. They demanded anonymity because they were not authorized to divulge the date of the meeting before official announcements by the IAEA or Iran.

They spoke just hours ahead of the expected release of the latest IAEA report documenting advances of Iran’s nuclear program. The document will be closely watched for activities that the United States and other critics of Tehran say are meant to move Iran closer to the ability to make nuclear arms.

The diplomats said the report is expected to reveal that Iran has substantially increased the number of its centrifuges — the machines that spin uranium gas into the material that can be used either for reactor fuel or to arm warheads, depending on the level of enrichment. Iran has produced only fuel-grade enriched uranium. But that can be further enriched to weapons-grade material, and more centrifuges translate into increases in Iran’s enriched stockpile.

Concerns have increased since Iran started installing advanced centrifuges, whose enrichment rate is up to four times higher than the machines it is now using.

The last IAEA report in May said Tehran had installed close to 700 high-tech IR2-m centrifuges, without making moves to start them up. It also said Tehran had added hundreds of older-generation machines at its main enrichment site to bring the total number to more than 13,000.

One of the diplomats said that beyond increases in numbers, Wednesday’s report will be scrutinized to see if any of the modern machines had been put under vacuum — a prelude to operating them — since the May report. He said that — because the IR2’s are faster than the older machines — such a move would be of concern to nations worried that Iran is expanding its enrichment capacity because it wants to use the program to make weapons-grade uranium.

The report is also expected to outline advances in Iran’s construction of a reactor at Arak. The US, Israel and Iran’s other critics say the reactor, in central Iran, will be able to produce plutonium for several bombs a year once it starts up, within the next year or so.

The May report noted that much work needed to be done at the reactor site, but it said Iranian technicians there already had taken delivery of a huge reactor vessel to contain the facility’s fuel. It also detailed progress in Tehran’s plans to manufacture and test the fuel.

US intelligence officials say they generally stand by a 2007 intelligence assessment that asserts Iran stopped comprehensive secret work on developing nuclear arms in 2003. But Britain, France, Germany, Israel and other US allies think such activities have continued past that date. That view is shared by the IAEA, which says some isolated and sporadic activities may be ongoing.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

Join us!
A message from the Editor of Times of Israel
David Horovitz

The Times of Israel covers one of the most complicated, and contentious, parts of the world. Determined to keep readers fully informed and enable them to form and flesh out their own opinions, The Times of Israel has gradually established itself as the leading source of independent and fair-minded journalism on Israel, the region and the Jewish world.

We've achieved this by investing ever-greater resources in our journalism while keeping all of the content on our site free.

Unlike many other news sites, we have not put up a paywall. But we would like to invite readers who can afford to do so, and for whom The Times of Israel has become important, to help support our journalism by joining The Times of Israel Community. Join now and for as little as $6 a month you can both help ensure our ongoing investment in quality journalism, and enjoy special status and benefits as a Times of Israel Community member.

Become a member of The Times of Israel Community
read more:
comments