Urban art adorns anti-terror concrete
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Urban art adorns anti-terror concrete

Colorful images spruce up train station barriers erected following hit-and-run terror attacks

People pass by a graffiti painted concrete block that was placed following the recent hit-and-run terror attacks. (Photo credit: Hadas Parush/Flash90)
People pass by a graffiti painted concrete block that was placed following the recent hit-and-run terror attacks. (Photo credit: Hadas Parush/Flash90)

The large concrete blocks placed at Jerusalem’s train stations to prevent additional hit-and-run terror attacks have been transformed in recent days into canvases for graffiti art.

Street artists are decorating the fresh surfaces with bright colors and messages of unity on the barriers, which are designed to physically stop terrorists from driving their cars into pedestrians.

The decision to deploy the barriers along Jerusalem’s light rail line came after the most recent hit-and-run terror attack on November 5, which left a Border Police officer and a teenager dead and several other people injured after an East Jerusalem driver steered his van onto the light rail route and into pedestrians.

A similar attack carried out October 22 killed two people, including a 3-month-old baby.

People pass by a graffiti painted concrete block that was placed following the recent hit-and-run terror attacks. (Photo credit: Hadas Parush/Flash90)
People pass by a graffiti painted concrete block that was placed following the recent hit-and-run terror attacks. (Photo credit: Hadas Parush/Flash90)

Jerusalem, and its light rail train system in particular, has faced disruptions and riots for months as Palestinian protesters have clashed with Israeli security forces.

Barriers in the Issawiya area of East Jerusalem put up by police to restrict access to the flashpoint Arab neighborhood were also given a gussying up.

Israeli Border Police guard at the new cement blocks at the entrance to Issawiya, in East Jerusalem on November 12, 2014. (photo credit: Hadas Parush/Flash90)
Israeli Border Police guard at the new cement blocks at the entrance to Issawiya, in East Jerusalem on November 12, 2014. (photo credit: Hadas Parush/Flash90)
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