An ancient wine press likely dating from Roman times was uncovered within the grounds of a disused IDF military base in Jerusalem, the Israel Antiques Authority said on Wednesday.

The IAA excavated the former Schneller base ahead of the construction of residential buildings on the site for the capital’s ultra-Orthodox community.

Various discoveries were made during the dig, including a large winery from either the Roman or Byzantine period, around 1,600 years ago. Archaeologists found a white mosaic surface surrounding a pit that was part of the wine press used to extract juice from grapes.

Eight cells around the press were used to store grapes and possibly to blend wine, the IAA said. Investigators suggested the press was part of a large manor house whose residents may have sold the wine.

“Once again, Jerusalem demonstrates that wherever one turns over a stone, ancient artifacts will be found related to the city’s glorious past,” said archaeologist Alex Wiegmann, excavation director on behalf of the IAA. “The archaeological finds discovered here help paint a living, vibrant and dynamic picture of Jerusalem as it was in ancient times up until the modern era.”

An aerial view of a Roman winery uncovered at the former IDF Schneller military base in Jerusalem, February 2016. (Guy Fitoussi, Israel Antiquities Authority)

An aerial view of a Roman winery uncovered at the former IDF Schneller military base in Jerusalem, February 2016. (Guy Fitoussi, Israel Antiquities Authority)

Remains of a bathhouse were also found, including terra cotta pipes used to heat the bathing facility and clay bricks stamped with the title of the Tenth Roman Legion, one of the four legions that took part in the siege and destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE. Units of the legion remained garrisoned in the city until around 300 CE.

The close proximity of the Schneller site to the International Conference Center, where the remains of a large pottery and brick production center were previously found, led archaeologists to believe that Schneller was an auxiliary to the main site.

Terra cotta pipes uncovered on the site of the former IDF Schneller military base in Jerusalem constitute evidence of the existence of an ancient bath house that operated at the location. (Israel Antiquities Authority)

Terra cotta pipes uncovered on the site of the former IDF Schneller military base in Jerusalem constitute evidence of the existence of an ancient bathhouse at the location. (Israel Antiquities Authority)

Excavations six months ago found the remains of a Jewish community at the Schneller compound dating from the late Second Temple period, around the time of Jesus.

During its more recent history, the site housed the Schneller orphanage from 1860 until World War II. During the British Mandate its German occupants were expelled and it became a military base. In 1948 it was taken over by the Haganah — the precursor to the IDF — and it later became an IDF military base that was active until it was closed in 2008.