British police said duped into permitting neo-Nazi rally
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British police said duped into permitting neo-Nazi rally

‘Blood and Honour’ members told local authorities outdoor gathering was fundraising event to benefit UK military charity

Neo-Nazis attend an event to mark the anniversary of the death of Blood and Honour founder in Camridgeshire, Britain on September 23 and 24. (screen capture: BBC News)
Neo-Nazis attend an event to mark the anniversary of the death of Blood and Honour founder in Camridgeshire, Britain on September 23 and 24. (screen capture: BBC News)

British police were duped into permitting a neo-Nazi rally to take place last month, after they were told the large outdoor gathering was a charity event to benefit injured soldiers.

Almost 400 white supremacists from across Europe descended on the in the quiet rural village of Haddenham on September 23 and 24 to mark the anniversary of the death of Ian Stuart Donaldson, who founded white supremacist group Blood and Honour.

According to the BBC, rally organizers told Cambridgeshire Police the rally was a fundraising event for British military charity Help for Heroes. The application submitted to police and the local planning council listed the rally as a “private party with music.”

The farmer who rented his field to the group, also said he was unaware of the white supremacist nature of the event.

“When we found out what it was we did not take any money for it,” he told British newspapers. “We won’t be renting the field out to anybody again.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDBVS9vAbcw

Blood and Honor describes itself as a movement that offers an “alternative lifestyle to the drug infested, pro homosexual, race mixing scene fanatically pushed by today’s powers to be.”

The group has been banned in a number of countries across Europe and in Russia. Reports in British media said three-quarters of those attending the rally traveled from Germany, Poland and the Netherlands.

For several years, Blood and Honour have held memorial events on the anniversary of group founder Donaldson’s death in a car crash in 1993 in Britain.

Hope for Heroes, a charity that assists injured servicemen and their families, said it was unaware of the event and firmly denied any involvement in the rally.

Mark Gardner from Community Security Trust, a British group working against anti-Semitism, told the BBC that it appeared that somebody had “pulled the wool over the police’s eyes.”

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