Cafe’s map of Israel sparks outrage
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Tempest in a coffee cupTempest in a coffee cup

Cafe’s map of Israel sparks outrage

Customers call for a boycott of Cofizz after the coffee chain runs ad featuring a map of pre-1967 Israel

An ad published by coffee chain Cofizz did not include  the West Bank or the Golan (screen capture: Facebook)
An ad published by coffee chain Cofizz did not include the West Bank or the Golan (screen capture: Facebook)

The Cofizz coffee chain angered costumers this week after an ad showing its new branch locations featured a pre-1967 map of Israel.

The ad, which was uploaded to Cofizz’s Facebook page on Tuesday, was noticeably absent the West Bank and the Golan Heights.

It also incorrectly placed Tel Aviv near the Gaza Strip, Ramat Gan south of Rishon Lezion, and Jerusalem in the Beersheba area.

The ad, which Cofizz termed an “unfortunate oversight,” triggered a social media uproar, with thousands calling for a boycott of the discount coffee chain in protest.

Cofizz immediately issued an apology and published a revised map, assuring customers that the ad was not intended to be a political statement, but was rather a mistake.

The revised map published by Cofizz, showing the Golan Heights, West Bank, and Gaza Strip as being a part of Israel. (screen capture: Facebook)
The revised map published by Cofizz, showing the Golan Heights, West Bank, and Gaza Strip as being a part of Israel. (screen capture: Facebook)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The updated map shows the Golan Heights, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip as a part of Israel.

The issue of where to draw Israel’s borders has been highly contested since Israel captured the West Bank, East Jerusalem, Gaza and the Golan Heights in 1967.

While both the Golan Heights and East Jerusalem were effectively annexed by Israel, the West Bank and Gaza were not.

Most maps in Israel include the West Bank and many still include the Gaza Strip, which Israel withdrew from in 2005, though new ones often do omit the southern enclave.

Cofizz’s inclusion of the disputed territories in its updated map may raise yet more hackles.

The company’s apology explained that the graphic design studio responsible for the ad purchased the map from an international image and graphics provider, and did not notice the geographical errors.

“The map that was used was the result of a human error and company negligence, and was not intended to offend the public in any way,” the company said in a statement posted to Facebook just hours after the original post. “We apologize to anyone who was offended by the advertisement and regret the error.”

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