Jewish home in Las Vegas targeted with anti-Semitic graffiti; owner plans aliya
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Jewish home in Las Vegas targeted with anti-Semitic graffiti; owner plans aliya

Sara Attia, already planning on leaving US for Israel, finds Nazi symbol and ‘Heil Hitler’ sprayed on her front door, in second incident of swastikas daubed on area homes in a week

Stuart Winer is a breaking news editor at The Times of Israel.

Screen capture from video of Sara Attia, a Las Vegas resident who found Nazi graffiti sprayed on her family's home in Las Vegas, November 5, 2018. (Fox 5 Vegas)
Screen capture from video of Sara Attia, a Las Vegas resident who found Nazi graffiti sprayed on her family's home in Las Vegas, November 5, 2018. (Fox 5 Vegas)

Police are investigating after a Jewish home in Las Vegas was tagged with anti-Semitic graffiti on Monday, the second incident within a week of Nazi symbols sprayed on residential buildings.

Sara Attia said she called police after finding a swastika and the phrase “Heil Hitler” drawn on the door of her apartment, the Las Vegas Review Journal reported.

Attia, 27, speaks Hebrew and noted she is open about being Jewish and has no doubt that her home was deliberately targeted.

Police officers also came to her children’s Chabad day school and said they would step up patrols in the area, the Review-Journal reported.

The incident happened only days after several swastikas were discovered sprayed on the home of non-Jewish Las Vegas family.

Police did not consider it a hate crime and believed it was more likely a random attack by teenagers, according to media reports.

Attia told the Review Journal she hopes that the vandalism was just “some dumb teenager who doesn’t know any better.”

“A joke or not, it wasn’t funny,” she added.

Attia, who was already planning on moving to Israel before the incident, told the Israeli Ynet news site that the incident had reinforced her belief that she should leave America due to anti-Semitism.

Officials have pointed to a rise in anti-Semitism in the US in recent years, which culminated with the shooting of 11 worshipers at a Pittsburgh synagogue last month. The Anti-Defamation League identified 1,986 anti-Semitic incidents in the US in 2017, up from 1,267 in 2016, and also reported a major increase in anti-Semitic online harassment.

Attia told Ynet she and her husband speak Hebrew to each other and their children to prepare them for the move to Israel where they plan to join members of her family in Haifa.

“At the end of the day if there was a time to immigrate — it is now. Once again we hear hate speech which has no place in this century,” she told Ynet. “This is the time to immigrate.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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