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Trump: 'I have tremendous love for Israel. I happen to have a son-in-law and a daughter that are Jewish, OK?'

‘Most pro-Israel’ Trump: Semblance of neutrality needed to end conflict

Amid criticism from fellow candidates, Republican front-runner says his approach is the most likely to lead to peace

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during the Republican presidential debate sponsored by CNN, Salem Media Group and the Washington Times at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during the Republican presidential debate sponsored by CNN, Salem Media Group and the Washington Times at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, Thursday, March 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Republican front-runner Donald Trump defended his approach on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict Thursday night, stressing that he believes that appearing somewhat neutral with regard to the decades-long territorial and religious dispute would be the most viable approach to potentially brokering a final peace deal between the two nations.

Speaking at the 12th Republican presidential debate, which took place at the University of Miami ahead of next week’s primaries in Florida, Trump said that while “there’s nobody that’s more pro-Israel” than he is, in order to advance a peace plan in the Middle East, he would have to at least make Palestinians believe he was somewhat neutral.

Trump asserted that striking a peace deal between Israel and the Palestinians would be “maybe the toughest negotiation of all time.”

Asserting his pro-Israel credentials, Trump recalled, “I was the grand marshall, not so long ago, of the Israeli Day Parade down 5th Avenue. I’ve made massive contributions to Israel… I have tremendous love for Israel. I happen to have a son-in-law and a daughter that are Jewish, OK? And two grandchildren that are Jewish.”

The remaining Republican presidential candidates, Texas Senator Ted Cruz, Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Ohio Governor John Kasich, all said they believed it would be wrong to exercise neutrality toward the Palestinians, with each instead expressing support for the Israeli government.

Cruz maintained that Israel is the US’s strongest ally in the Middle East, and noted that the Palestinian Authority had entered a unity government with the Hamas terrorist organization. He went on to call neutrality a position of “moral relativism.”

Rubio charged that Trump’s stance is anti-Israel, given, the Florida senator claimed, that the Palestinians are uninterested in a peace deal, and want the Jewish state eliminated.

Kasich said that the Palestinians, and not Israel, were propelling violence and incitement in the region.

Republican presidential candidates (from left) Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, stand together during the singing of the National Anthem, before the start of the Republican presidential debate sponsored by CNN, Salem Media Group and the Washington Times at the University of Miami, Thursday, March 10, 2016, in Coral Gables, Florida (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
Republican presidential candidates (from left) Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, stand together during the singing of the National Anthem, before the start of the Republican presidential debate sponsored by CNN, Salem Media Group and the Washington Times at the University of Miami, Thursday, March 10, 2016, in Coral Gables, Florida (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Abandoning the nasty insults of past debates, Trump and his Republican rivals turned Thursday’s presidential face-off into a mostly respectful discussion of social security, Islam, trade and more. Trump shook his head and declared at one point: “I can’t believe how civil it’s been up here.”

Cruz and Rubio found plenty of areas of difference with Trump, but the candidates largely managed to lay them out without vitriol.

In a lengthy discussion of the threat posed by radicalized Muslims, Trump refused to back away from his recent statement that “Islam hates the West.”

Asked if he meant all Muslims, Trump said: “I mean a lot of them” and he wouldn’t be “politically correct” by avoiding such statements.

Rubio had a pointed comeback: “I’m not interested in being politically correct. I’m interested in being correct.”

The Florida senator noted the Muslims in the US military and buried in Arlington National Cemetery and said the only way to solve the problem of violent extremists is to work with people in the Muslim faith who are not radicals.

Cruz bundled together his criticisms of Trump for what he called simplistic solutions on trade and on Islamic terrorists, saying, “The answer is not to simply yell, ‘China: bad, Muslim: bad.”

Trump, though, clearly was intent on projecting a less bombastic — and more presidential — image.

“We’re all in this together,” he said early on, sounding more like a conciliator than a provocateur as he strives to unify the party behind his candidacy. “We’re going to come up with solutions. We’re going to find the answer to things.”

Trump’s rivals, in a desperate scramble to halt his march to the nomination, gradually ramped up their criticism as the night wore on.

Rubio’s overarching message: “I know that a lot of people find appeal in the things Donald says. The problem is presidents can’t just say anything they want because it has consequences around the world.”

Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), talk during a broadcast break in the CNN, Salem Media Group, The Washington Times Republican Presidential Primary Debate on the campus of the University of Miami on March 10, 2016 in Coral Gables, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images/AFP)
Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), talk during a broadcast break in the CNN, Salem Media Group, The Washington Times Republican Presidential Primary Debate on the campus of the University of Miami on March 10, 2016 in Coral Gables, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images/AFP)

Cruz, eager to cement his position as the party’s last best alternative to Trump, had a string of criticisms of the GOP front-runner, too, saying flatly at one point: “His solutions don’t work.”

Trump refused to take the bait when Cruz repeatedly poked at his foreign policy positions and at one point lumped Trump with Hillary Clinton and John Kerry in supporting the Obama administration’s Iran nuclear deal.

Trump’s restrained response: “If Ted was listening, he would have heard me say something very similar” to what Cruz had said about the failings of the deal.

In a meaty discussion of social security, Cruz and Rubio both said they’d gradually raise the retirement age for younger workers to help stabilize the system and stave off financial disaster for the system.

Trump, in contrast, said he’d do “everything within my power not to touch social security, to leave it the way it is.”

On that issue, the GOP front-runner couldn’t resist taking a dig at the Democrats, saying he’d been watching them intensely on such issues —”even though it’s a very, very boring thing to watch” — and that they weren’t doing anything on social security.

Cruz said the system was “careening toward insolvency” and it would be irresponsible not to address that. Rubio said Trump’s plan to save the system by reducing wouldn’t work. Eliminating all fraud and waste “is not enough,” he said. “The numbers don’t add up.”

Each of the candidates had an urgent mission as the GOP debate gave them a last chance to put their case to a televised audience of millions before voters in Florida and four other states dish out delegates next Tuesday. Those elections will go a long way toward determining the outcome of the primary season.

Cruz was seeking to make it a two-man race with Trump. Rubio was out to save his flagging candidacy by energizing voters in his home state of Florida. John Kasich was hoping his above-the-fray strategy would finally pay off.

Trump, for his part, was itching to give his front-runner’s campaign a giant thrust toward the nomination by dominating his dwindling cast of rivals.

President Barack Obama, offering political commentary from the sidelines, said earlier in the day the party was going through a “Republican crackup” that had taken on the tone of a “circus.” He blamed the GOP itself for fostering the idea “that cooperation or compromise somehow is a betrayal.”

Florida is the biggest prize of Tuesday’s five-state round of voting, and all 99 of the state’s delegates will go to the winner.

In all, 367 Republican delegates will be at stake, with voting also occurring in Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio and the Northern Mariana Islands.

Kasich, who has tried to stay out of the name-calling, pinned his hopes of survival on bringing home the 66 delegates in his state’s winner-take-all primary. He has yet to win anywhere.

In the race for delegates, Trump has 458, Cruz 359, Rubio 151 and Kasich 54. It takes 1,237 to win the Republican nomination for president.

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