Pilot of plane from Israel in UK scare describes ‘heart attack’ as jets neared
search

Pilot of plane from Israel in UK scare describes ‘heart attack’ as jets neared

Captain details how his flight briefly lost radio contact over Britain and his surprise to see two RAF Typhoons outside his window; sonic boom caused panic in London

Illustrative: Royal Air Force Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jets escort a transport plane, above eastern Romania, Friday, April 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
Illustrative: Royal Air Force Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jets escort a transport plane, above eastern Romania, Friday, April 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

The pilot of a Boeing 767 plane flying from Israel to the United States that caused a scare in the United Kingdom early Sunday has described how the aircraft’s radio went down and his shock at seeing two fighter jets flying closely alongside.

The incident caused Royal Air Force jets to be scrambled toward the silent aircraft, setting off a sonic boom that sounded throughout London early in the morning, frightening residents.

“It took us about 10 minutes to realize that the radio wasn’t working and then about 10 minutes to resolve that problem,” pilot Steven Giordano told the BBC.

The retired El Al plane, which was registered on November 20 to California-based leasing company Pacific Aircorp, took off from Ben Gurion Airport at around 1 a.m. Sunday on its way to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in the US.

On the way, around 4 a.m. (UK time), it did not respond to British authorities’ attempt to contact it due to a communications malfunction.

Two Typhoon fighter jets were scrambled from an Royal Air Force base in Coningsby and intercepted the plane, UK media reported. After communications with the aircraft were restored, the flight continued as planned toward the US and the fighter jets returned to their base.

“Amazing how fast the RAF reacted. I applaud them for that,” said Giordano, adding that he and his crew had been busy trying to restore communications and had not noticed the fighters come alongside.

“I looked left and about had a heart attack when I saw one – so close – strobes on and with blueish ‘glow strips’ along the side of his fuselage,” he said.

“We flashed our landing lights to acknowledge and established radio contact on ‘guard’… with the fighters,” he said noting that they had already reestablished contact with London at that point.

“They remained with us for about five minutes,” he said.

But while the incident ended safely, it definitely didn’t end quietly. The air force planes had been cleared to go faster than the speed of sound on their way to intercept the unresponsive aircraft, setting off a loud bang that woke up many residents of Britain’s capital.

Many subsequently shared their experience on social media and with UK media, along with videos of the incident in which the sonic boom can be heard.

read more:
comments