Public urged to trash eggs after salmonella found
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Public urged to trash eggs after salmonella found

Some 11 million eggs marketed by Yesh MaOf with sell by dates of up to and including October 20 may be infected

Barcodes that say XL and M size eggs written on cartons of eggs in Mahane Yehuda Market in Jerusalem, May, 12 2013. (Sarah Schuman/ Flash90)
Barcodes that say XL and M size eggs written on cartons of eggs in Mahane Yehuda Market in Jerusalem, May, 12 2013. (Sarah Schuman/ Flash90)

The health and agriculture ministries on Tuesday called on the public not to buy or use eggs sold by “Yesh MaOf” that bear a sell-by date of up to and including October 20, following the discovery of salmonella in a part of the company’s laying sheds at Moshav Goren in the northern Israeli Galilee.

Some 11 million suspect eggs have already reached the market.

Eggs already at home should be thrown into the trash and not returned to the retailer, the Health Ministry said.

The salmonella came to light during a routine inspection of sheds at Moshav Goren carried out by Agriculture Ministry inspectors.

One shed was definitely infected by salmonella, the Hebrew-language The Marker news site said. Another was clean, and a further two were still being inspected.

According to the Health Ministry, inspectors have already checked 60 percent of laying sheds in the country as part of a rolling program to control salmonella, but have found the bacteria in less than three percent of them.

משרד הבריאות: לא לצרוך ביצים הנושאות את שם המשווק "יש מעוף"http://bit.ly/2vGScvV

Posted by ‎צבע אדום‎ on otrdiena, 2017. gada 5. septembris

In May, the Health Ministry announced a recent rise in salmonella poisoning in Israel and in 14 European countries.

Eggs are suspected as the source of the poisoning, whose symptoms include stomach cramps, vomiting and diarrhea.

The bacteria enters the food chain in two ways: from outside, when laying hens come into contact with dead birds, excrement or other pollutants; and internally, when the bacteria pass from the hens’ reproductive systems straight to the eggs.

Children, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems are particularly susceptible.

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