Tunisia beach attack linked with earlier attack, British police say
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Tunisia beach attack linked with earlier attack, British police say

Evidence connecting June massacre with attack at national museum months earlier sent to coroner

Bodies are covered on a Tunisian beach, in Sousse, Friday June 26, 2015. A young man unfurled an umbrella and pulled out a Kalashnikov, opening fire on European sunbathers in an attack that killed at least 28 people. (Jawhara FM via AP)
Bodies are covered on a Tunisian beach, in Sousse, Friday June 26, 2015. A young man unfurled an umbrella and pulled out a Kalashnikov, opening fire on European sunbathers in an attack that killed at least 28 people. (Jawhara FM via AP)

British police found strong evidence linking a deadly terror attack at a Tunisian hotel in June with an earlier attack at the national museum in March.

The coroner had been advised of the findings, the Guardian reported Wednesday.

A gunman opened fire on beach goers in June in the coastal resort city of Sousse, killing 38 people, mostly British tourists.

Three months earlier, gunmen killed 21, mostly foreign tourists, at the country’s national museum in Tunis.

The Islamic State took responsibility for both attacks.

The gunmen of the two attacks had been trained at the same time in a jihadi camp in Libya, Tunisian authorities said last week.

Tunisia has arrested 150 people for involvement in the attack and passed a controversial anti-terror law that some claimed endangered human rights.

The new law raised the amount of time police can hold a suspect without charge and without contact with a lawyer from six days to 15.

The attacker of the Sousse attack was identified as Seifeddine Rezgui, a 24-year-old graduate of Tunisia’s Kairouan University where he had been living with the other students. The attack was claimed by the Islamic State.

The June attack constituted the most serious attack on the British since 52 people were killed in attacks targeting London’s transport network in July 2005.

AP contributed to this report.

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