Israel’s richest neighborhood is just three miles away from its poorest one
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Israel’s richest neighborhood is just three miles away from its poorest one

4 of 5 neighborhoods with the highest socioeconomic scores are located in the Tel Aviv area; those with lowest are largely ultra-Orthodox

Luxury apartment towers are seen in the Tel Aviv neighborhood of Park Tzameret on August 24, 2015. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)
Luxury apartment towers are seen in the Tel Aviv neighborhood of Park Tzameret on August 24, 2015. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)

Israel’s wealthiest neighborhood and its poorest one are less than five kilometers (three miles) apart, according to official statistics released Thursday.

The Central Bureau of Statistics figures, based on data from 2015, ranked neighborhoods throughout the country in accordance with socioeconomic indicators.

Seven neighborhoods were placed in the top socioeconomic grouping, while 92 fell in the lowest possible.

The neighborhood with the highest socioeconomic measures was Park Tzameret in Tel Aviv, which houses a number of high-rise luxury apartment buildings.

Ramat Elhanan, in the nearby city of Bnei Brak, was the neighborhood with the lowest socioeconomic score. The predominantly ultra-Orthodox is regularly ranked as one of Israel’s poorest.

Illustrative: Barricades are erected at the entrance to the city of Bnei Brak to keep cars from entering on Shabbat, January 27, 2018. (Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)

The second wealthiest neighborhood after Park Tzameret was Tzahala, also in Tel Aviv, followed by Denia in the northern city of Haifa.

Rounding out the top five neighborhoods with the highest socioeconomic indicators were Tel Aviv’s Kokhav Hatzafon and Neve Rom in Ramat Hasharon, a city that borders Tel Aviv in the north.

After Ramat Elhanan, the CBS said the second poorest neighborhood was the area around Yad Eliyahu in Tel Aviv, followed by Kiryat Harama and Ramat Hatanai’m in Beit Shemesh, Mea Shearim in Jerusalem and Kiryat Degel HaTorah in the West Bank settlement of Modiin Illit.

Besides Yad Eliyahu, all of the neighborhoods with the lowest socioeconomic measures were predominantly ultra-Orthodox.

The socioeconomic score used by the CBS was made up of made 14 measures, among them education level, demographic makeup and employment.

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