‘Shame upon shame’: Iran denounces US, Saudi sanctions against Hezbollah
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‘Shame upon shame’: Iran denounces US, Saudi sanctions against Hezbollah

Foreign Minister Zarif says Tehran-funded terrorist group was first to 'shatter the myth of Israeli invincibility'

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zari arrives before a ministerial meeting of EU/E3 with Iran at the European Union headquarters in Brussels on May 15, 2018. (JOHN THYS/AFP)
Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zari arrives before a ministerial meeting of EU/E3 with Iran at the European Union headquarters in Brussels on May 15, 2018. (JOHN THYS/AFP)

Iran’s foreign minister on Thursday lashed out on Twitter at the US and Saudi Arabia for imposing sanctions on leaders of its Lebanese ally, terror group Hezbollah.

“Israeli snipers shoot over 2,000 unarmed Palestinian protesters on a single day,” Mohammad Javad Zarif said in a tweet referring to protests and clashes in the Gaza Strip that killed some 60 people this week.

The “Saudi response, on eve of Ramadan? Collaboration with its US patron to sanction the first force to liberate Arab territory and shatter the myth of Israeli invincibility. Shame upon shame,” he said.

The United States and six Gulf Arab states announced sanctions Wednesday on the leadership of Hezbollah, as Washington seeks to step up economic pressure on Iran and its allies in the region after US President Donald Trump withdrew this month from the 2015 nuclear deal.

The US and Saudi-led Terrorist Financing and Targeting Center said the sanctions were aimed at Hezbollah’s Shura Council, the powerful Lebanese group’s decision-making body, led by its secretary general Hassan Nasrallah.

Nasrallah, Hezbollah Deputy Secretary General Naim Qasim, and three other Shura Council members were listed under the joint sanctions, which aim at freezing vulnerable assets of those named and blocking their access to global financial networks.

At the same time, the six Gulf members of the TFTC — Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates — declared sanctions on another nine individuals and firms part of or linked to Hezbollah that were already blacklisted by the US Treasury.

A tank flying the Hezbollah terror group’s flag is seen in the Qara area in Syria’s Qalamoun region on August 28, 2017 (AFP Photo/Louai Beshara)

Hezbollah is a key player in Lebanese politics, and it maintains its own arsenal of weapons and fighting force.

The terror group is fighting in Syria alongside President Bashar Assad’s military, and it has trained Iraqi Shiite militias which participated in retaking territory from the Islamic State group.

The sanctions by Gulf states follow two US moves this month to put pressure on Iran’s financial networks, including sanctions announced Tuesday aimed at an alleged financial pipeline that moved “hundreds of millions of dollars” from Iran’s central bank through an Iraqi bank to Hezbollah.

The European Union has viewed Hezbollah’s armed wing as a terrorist organization since 2013.

In 2016, the six Arab Sunni powers of the Gulf Co-operation Council — Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar and Oman — designated Hezbollah a terrorist organization.

The Hamas-run Gaza health ministry said Tuesday that 62 Palestinians were killed and over 2,700 injured in clashes along the border on Monday and Tuesday. A Hamas official on Wednesday acknowledged that 50 of the Palestinians reported killed were members of the Islamist terrorist group; Islamic Jihad said Tuesday that three of the dead were its members.

Israel claims that Hamas, which rules the Strip and openly calls for Israel’s destruction, was spurring the violence and using it as cover for attacks.

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