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Magical mixture

Annual Musrara Mix art and musical festival goes online

Jerusalem event will look at healing and magical traditions through dedicated festival website

Jessica Steinberg covers the Sabra scene from south to north and back to the center.

An artwork by Tunni Kraus Kinot, featured at Musrara Mix, the Jerusalem-based art festival taking place online, December 15-17, 2020 (Courtesy Musrara Mix)
An artwork by Tunni Kraus Kinot, featured at Musrara Mix, the Jerusalem-based art festival taking place online, December 15-17, 2020 (Courtesy Musrara Mix)

You don’t need to travel to Jerusalem to take part in this year’s art and musical festival Musrara Mix. Celebrating its 20th year, the multidisciplinary festival is being held online, with a dedicated website for its program of featured Israeli and international artists.

Produced by Musrara — The Naggar School of Art and Society, and housed in the historic surroundings of the Musrara neighborhood, the festival will span three days with a program of video performances, video art, pre-recorded shows, an international student film contest and audiovisual works, all under the direction of festival curator Vera Korman and festival director Avi Sabag.

The works will open for viewing every day at a scheduled time and will remain available for streaming for 24 hours.

This year, the festival staff invited musician and performance artist Noam Enbar to curate a special program about Transfiguration, part of the festival theme of healing and magical traditions.

Artwork by Melanie Bonajo, ‘Nocturnal Gardening,’ featured at Musrara Mix, the Jerusalem art festival taking place online December 15-17, 2020 (Courtesy Musrara Mix)

Given the global pandemic that has affected every aspect of peoples’ lives, the festival will examine the new relationships between spirituality and art, and the constant changes taking place in the world.

The participating artists were invited to create artworks addressing the transfiguration theme, and many chose to create their works in the physical spaces of the Jerusalem neighborhood.

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