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'We have to separate feelings from politics'

Free prisoners if it will bring peace, says one bereaved daughter

Eida Kinstler, whose father was killed in 1992, argues that victimhood does not grant special privileges

Stuart Winer is a breaking news editor at The Times of Israel.

Palestinians rallying in November 2012 for hunger-striking prisoners to be released. (photo credit: Abed Rahim Khatib/Flash90)
Palestinians rallying in November 2012 for hunger-striking prisoners to be released. (photo credit: Abed Rahim Khatib/Flash90)

While dozens of family members of terror victims protested in Tel Aviv on Monday against the freeing of 26 Palestinian prisoners, and others filed a petition to the Supreme Court in an effort to halt it, one bereaved daughter came out publicly in support of the move.

“If the government believes releasing the murderer will help advance peace, there is no doubt that it is the right thing to do,” said Eida Kinstler, whose 84-year old father was murdered by Faraj Saleh al-Rimahi, one of the Palestinians slated for release in the coming days. “It is not only its right to do so, it is its obligation. We have to separate feelings from politics.”

The prisoner release, the first of four phased releases, is a gesture to the PA ahead of the second round of peace talks due to commence Wednesday in Jerusalem. The two sides are set to meet again the week after in the West Bank town of Jericho.

In an interview with Army Radio, Kinstler said that the release of prisoners was a matter that should be decided by the government and that it was not the place of the victims’ families, or anybody else, to determine otherwise.

Kinstler said that she and her two sisters all felt the same way and were willing to put aside their own personal pain — which she said hadn’t abated even 20 years after their father’s death — if it would help bring about peace.

“Just because our father was murdered doesn’t give us any special privileges in making political decisions. The state is authorized to do as it feels with this murderer and the other murderers,” said Kinstler, who stressed that she supported the families’ right to protest, but not to impede the government’s decision.

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