Russian tourists in Israel advised not to swear
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Russian tourists in Israel advised not to swear

In travel guide, Moscow foreign ministry also recommends against criticizing Jewish state to Israelis

Illustrative: A Russian tourist jumps by the sea port in Tel Aviv, on March 18, 2016. (Yossi Zamir/Flash90)
Illustrative: A Russian tourist jumps by the sea port in Tel Aviv, on March 18, 2016. (Yossi Zamir/Flash90)

A new travel guide issued by the consular department of Russia’s foreign ministry advises Russian travelers to Israel against swearing in Yiddish and Arabic and to avoid criticizing the Jewish state.

Due to “the relatively low level of linguistic tolerance in Israel,” Russian travelers are advised to refrain from using Yiddish words such as “shmuck” and “putz,” while also being advised to avoid Arabic curse words such as “sharmuta,” according to the Haaretz daily.

Russians are also told to not the use the Russian term “jid,” a derogatory term for a Jew, as “it is unacceptable to any Jew, even if he does not understand Russian.”

Concerning foul language, Russian tourists should also not be shocked to hear Russian curses while in Israel, which were introduced to the local vernacular by “Jewish immigrants to Palestine in the beginning of the 20th century.”

According to Haaretz, the foreign ministry guide also advises Russians “to take into account the heightened sensitivity of Israelis in practice to any type of criticism of the State of Israel or any aspects of life” in Israel.

In addition to Israel, Russian tourists should avoid “petting Thais’ heads” while in Thailand, not curse homosexuals while in France, refrain from making “man jokes” in Canada, and while in Kenya not compare Kenyans to monkeys.

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