Adviser to Iran’s supreme leader pushes uranium enrichment
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Adviser to Iran’s supreme leader pushes uranium enrichment

Ali Akbar Velayati says regime can ‘spin centrifuges for enrichment’ to higher levels should it choose to do so

Iranian presidential candidate Ali Akbar Velayati, a former foreign minister, walks past a portrait of supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei at the conclusion of his press conference in Tehran, Iran, Monday, June 3, 2013. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
Iranian presidential candidate Ali Akbar Velayati, a former foreign minister, walks past a portrait of supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei at the conclusion of his press conference in Tehran, Iran, Monday, June 3, 2013. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

TEHRAN, Iran — A top adviser to Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, is proposing Iran resume its uranium enrichment in the wake of the US withdrawal from the nuclear deal between world powers and Tehran.

Ali Akbar Velayati was quoted Wednesday by the semi-official Tasnim news agency as saying Iran is “capable to spin centrifuges for enrichment” to higher levels should it choose to do so.

Velayati says Iran should also accelerate production of nuclear propulsions and also research on advanced centrifuges. He claimed this wouldn’t violate the nuclear deal which put limits on Iran’s atomic program in exchange for lifting economic sanctions.

In the wake of US President Donald Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the deal, several Iranian officials have indicated Tehran could resume its nuclear program.

Tehran has warned it is prepared to resume “industrial-scale” uranium enrichment “without any restrictions” unless Europe can provide solid guarantees that it can maintain the economic benefits it gained from the nuclear agreement despite the United States reimposing sanctions.

The US pulled out of the pact earlier this month, and wants to impose tough sanctions on Iran, which also might also have an impact on some European companies doing business with Tehran.

European powers say they are committed to working together to save the deal as they believe it is the best way to keep Tehran from developing a nuclear weapon.

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