Appeals court sides with government in Sandy Hook shooting lawsuit
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Appeals court sides with government in Sandy Hook shooting lawsuit

Judge rules against parents of two victims, who allege school officials failed to follow mandated security protocol and order lockdown that may have saved lives

In this photo provided by the Newtown Bee, Connecticut State Police lead a line of children from the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut on December 14, 2012 after a shooting at the school. (AP Photo/Newtown Bee, Shannon Hicks)
In this photo provided by the Newtown Bee, Connecticut State Police lead a line of children from the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut on December 14, 2012 after a shooting at the school. (AP Photo/Newtown Bee, Shannon Hicks)

HARTFORD — A Connecticut appeals court in a Friday ruling upheld a lower court decision to throw out a lawsuit filed by the parents of two Sandy Hook School shooting victims against Newtown and its school district.

The appeals court agreed with the lower court’s determination that the town is protected by government immunity.

The wrongful death lawsuit was brought by the parents of Jesse Lewis and Noah Pozner. It alleged that school officials failed to follow a mandated security protocol and order a lockdown that may have saved lives immediately after the gunman shot his way into the school. They also faulted the school for having classroom doors that could be locked only from the hallway.

The town’s lawyers argued that ordering a lockdown was discretionary and school officials initially were not sure what was happening.

Last month, Pozner’s father won a defamation lawsuit against the authors of a book that claimed the shooting never happened.

The book, “Nobody Died at Sandy Hook,” has also been pulled to settle claims against its publisher filed by Lenny Pozner.

Lenny Pozner with his son Noah. (Courtesy)

The Jewish Pozner has been pushing back for years against hoaxers who have harassed him, subjected him to death threats and claimed that he was an actor and his son never existed. He has worked to get Facebook and others to remove conspiracy videos and set up a website to debunk conspiracy theories.

Lately, the fight has been joined by others who lost relatives in the December 14, 2012, shooting. After quietly enduring harassment and ridiculous assertions for years, some have changed their approach, deciding that the only way to stop it is to confront it. Their efforts have turned the tables on the hoaxers, including Alex Jones, host of the conspiracy-driven Infowars website.

Times of Israel contributed to this report.

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