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Israel flag, ‘Thank you, Mossad’ sign appear in Iran after nuke scientist killed

Display in Tehran suburb comes 10 days after assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, allegedly by Israeli intelligence

An Israeli flag and sign reading 'Thank you, Mossad' in a Tehran suburb (screencapture via Twitter)
An Israeli flag and sign reading 'Thank you, Mossad' in a Tehran suburb (screencapture via Twitter)

An Israeli flag and an English sign reading “Thank you, Mossad” were placed over a billboard in Iran on Monday, following the assassination of a top Iranian nuclear scientist last month, allegedly by Israel.

Photos of the flag and sign in a Tehran suburb — plastered over a soda ad on a bridge — were widely shared on social media.

It was unclear who stood behind the message praising Israel’s intelligence agency.

Iranian authorities have blamed Israel and the exiled opposition group the People’s Mujahedeen of Iran (MEK) for the assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, long regarded by Israel and the US as the head of Iran’s rogue nuclear weapons program. They have vowed revenge. Israel has not publicly commented on the allegations.

Fakhrizadeh, who was killed on November 27, was named by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in 2018 as the director of Iran’s rogue nuclear weapons project. When Netanyahu revealed then that Israel had removed from a warehouse in Tehran a vast archive of Iran’s own material detailing its nuclear weapons program, he said: “Remember that name, Fakhrizadeh.”

He was also an officer in Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, designated by the US as a terrorist organization.

Israel has long been suspected of carrying out a series of targeted killings of Iranian nuclear scientists nearly a decade ago, in a bid to curtail Iran’s rogue nuclear weapons program. It has made no official comment on the matter.

Israeli officials have warned Israeli citizens traveling abroad that they may be targets of Iranian terror attacks in the wake of the killing, and cautioned former Israeli nuclear scientists they could be in Iran’s crosshairs.

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