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Israelis turn out to see rare ‘hybrid’ solar eclipse

The annular-turned-total eclipse covered around 13.5% of sun’s surface and lasted for an hour-and-a-half

A partial solar eclipse is seen from the Givatayim Observatory, near Tel Aviv, on Sunday, November 3, 2013. (photo credit: Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)
A partial solar eclipse is seen from the Givatayim Observatory, near Tel Aviv, on Sunday, November 3, 2013. (photo credit: Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)

A rare hybrid solar eclipse was visible over Israel for an hour-and-a-half on Sunday afternoon, beginning at 3:15 p.m. and continuing until sunset at 4:45. The eclipse, as viewed from Israel, covered approximately 13.5 percent of the sun’s surface.

Spectators in the Middle East, the east coast of the United States, southern Europe, and northern South America observed a partial eclipse, while in parts of central Africa the eclipse blotted out the sun entirely in a total eclipse.

A hybrid eclipse occurs when the eclipse begins as an annular eclipse — characterized by the substantial ring of fire shining around the moon — and develops into a total eclipse as the moon and sun align completely.

Hybrid solar eclipses are relatively rare, with only 4.8% of all solar eclipses classified as hybrids. The last hybrid eclipse was in 2006 and the next one is anticipated in 2023.

People wear special glasses as they watch a partial solar eclipse at the Givatayim Observatory, Sunday, November 3, 2013 (photo credit: Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)
Wearing special glasses at the Givatayim Observatory, on Sunday, November 3, 2013. (photo credit: Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)

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